Past Postdocs

Past Postdocs

Vanessa Cruz Nichols

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2017-2019

Email:
vcruznic@iu.edu

Vanessa Cruz Nichols was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society in 2017-19 and accepted a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Indiana University.  Her research interests have centered on citizen activism and motivators of political participation with a particular focus on reassessing the hypothesis that threat is the main catalyst that awakens the Latino “sleeping giant.” Instead of potentially exacerbating feelings of helplessness while only emphasizing a sense of urgency (or policy threat), combining these messages with more opportunity-based policy alternatives may be an improved strategy to catalyze a group to rise, and not succumb, to the challenge before them. Vanessa’s dissertation leveraged data from an original bilingual survey experiment and observational survey analyses from the American National Election Study. To build on her dissertation work, Vanessa is conducting mobilizer interviews and analyzing data from a second survey experiment, which delves into the causal mechanisms of fear and hope. Vanessa’s book project is tentatively titled “Latinos Rising to the Challenge: Political Responses to Peril and Promise.”

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2016-2018

Email:
dojlevy@indiana.edu

Dorainne Green was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University from 2016-2018. Following her fellowship with CRRES, she accepted a position as Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University. She received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Northwestern University in 2016. Her research explores the pathways through which stigma-related stressors contribute to disparities in education and health between socially advantaged and socially disadvantaged individuals. A primary interest is the identification of strategies to help stigmatized individuals manage the challenges of navigating diverse spaces, including those with the potential to expose them to stigma-related stressors.

Adam Bledsoe

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2016-2017

Adam Bledsoe was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society during the 2016-2017 academic year. Following his fellowship with CRRES, he accepted a tenure-track position as an Assistant Professor of Geography and African American Studies at Florida State University. His research focuses on racialization, social movements, and struggle in the context of the African Diaspora, drawing on participatory research, archival work, and critical theory to examine the historical and contemporary struggles of Black communities in Salvador, Brazil, as they seek to defend their territories from a series of land grabs. He is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively titled Defending Our Piece of Ground: The Quilombos of the Bay of Aratu.

Tristan Ivory

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2015-2017

Tristan Ivory served as a Postdoctoral Fellow with CRRES from 2015-2017, and is now  in a tenure-track position as an Assistant Professor in the Industrial and Labor Relations School at Cornell University.  Tristan’s areas of specialization include international migration, race and ethnicity, inequality, and transnationalism, and he utilizes ethnographic observation, interviews, contemporary news accounts, and archival data to examine the resources and strategies that Sub-Saharan African migrants use to try to maximize social and economic outcomes in the Tokyo Metropolitan Region. He is currently working on his first book project, tentatively titled Greener Pastures: Sub-Saharan Africans and the Pursuit of Social Mobility in Japan.

Hyeyoung Kwon

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2015-2017

Hyeyoung Kwon received her Ph.D. in Sociology from University of Southern California. Following her Postdoctoral Fellowship with CRRES (2015-2017), she accepted a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research focuses on immigration, comparative race/ethnicity, social inequality, and family. Drawing from in-depth interviews and ethnographic data, she is currently writing her book manuscript, tentatively titled, Translating Race, Class, and Immigrant Lives, which examines the daily lives of Mexican- and Korean-American “language brokers” who use their bilingual skills to navigate English-speaking institutions for their immigrant parents. In a socio-historical moment where immigrants of color are depicted as threats to the economic stability of “true” Americans, her work seeks to expose the contradictions between the ideal of equality and the actual practices of race, class, and language-based exclusion. Her publications appear in Social Problems, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, and Childhood.

Sean Everette Gantt

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2014-2016

Website:
https://seangantt.wordpress.com/

Sean Everette Gantt earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of New Mexico before joining CRRES as a Postdoctoral Fellow in 2014. Following his CRRES Fellowship, Sean accepted a position as Assistant Director of Education at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, CO. Sean is a visual and public anthropologist with training in archaeology and ethnography, specializing in Southeastern U.S. Native American Studies and focusing on economic development, indigenous self-representation, and identity. His dissertation, entitled “Nanta Hosh Chahta Immi? (What are Choctaw Ways?): Cultural Preservation in the Casino Era,” investigates the long-term impacts of tribal economic development programs on the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians reservation in East-Central Mississippi.

Diana Martha Louis

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2014-2016

Diana Martha Louis received her Ph.D. in English from Emory University in July 2014. Following her Postdoctoral Fellowship with CRRES, she accepted a tenure-track position as an Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and American Culture at the University of Michigan. Her research pursues the intersections of Disability Studies and Critical Race Studies with respect to issues of mental illness in African American life. Her current project, The Colored Insane: Slavery, Asylums and Mental Illness in 19th-Century America, examines the impact of major transformations in both American psychiatry and African Americans’ social condition—the end of one of America’s prototypical institutions of confinement and the expansion of another, slavery and asylums, respectively.

Nicole Ivy

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2013-2015

Following the conclusion of her Postdoctoral Fellowship with CRRES, Nicole became an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow in Washington, D.C., where she also worked as a Futurist with the Center for the Future of Museums. In this her unique role as a Futurist with a formation in History, Nicole collaborated with museums, educators, and researchers to innovate museum practice and conducts research on the history of labor organizing in the nonprofit sector. She is now an Assistant Professor in American Studies at George Washington University. Her scholarly work focuses on racial formations, memory, and the labor of representation. 

Julie Lee Merseth

CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2013-2015

Julie Lee Merseth received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 2013. After finishing her Postdoctoral Fellowship with CRRES in 2015, she accepted a tenure-track position as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Northwestern University. Her areas of specialization are situated in the field of American politics with a dual and overlapping focus on race and immigration. Her research is especially animated by questions of how racial and ethnic politics in the United States are changing as a result of fast-growing populations of immigrants, largely from Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Her current book project, tentatively titled, Beyond Panethnicity: Immigration and the Challenges of Racial Solidarity, investigates the potential and pitfalls of forging a race-based political solidarity among Asian Americans and Latinos.

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