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College of Arts and Sciences

Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society

Center for Research on
Race and Ethnicity in Society

Current Postdocs

Tristan IvoryTristan Ivory, CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2015-2017
tivory@indiana.edu

Tristan Ivory is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. He received his PhD in 2015 from the Department of Sociology at Stanford University. Tristan's areas of specialization include international migration, race and ethnicity, inequality, and transnationalism. His dissertation uses ethnographic observation, interviews, contemporary news accounts, and archival data to examine the resources and strategies Sub-Saharan African migrants use to try to maximize social and economic outcomes in the Tokyo Metropolitan Region. Tristan is currently revising articles from his dissertation research as well as writing the first chapters of his dissertation book project, tentatively titled "Greener Pastures: Sub-Saharan Africans and the Pursuit of Social Mobility in Japan."

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Hyeyoung KwonHyeyoung Kwon, CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2015-2017
kwonhye@indiana.edu

Hyeyoung Kwon is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. She received her Ph.D. from University of Southern California and her M.A from University of California, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on immigration, comparative race/ethnicity, social inequality, and family. She is currently working on her book manuscript, tentatively titled, "Translating Race and Class: The Family Work of Bilingual Children of Immigrants," which analyzes how racial meanings that depict Latinos as a problematic underclass and Asian Americans as successful foreigners reverberate in the family lives of working class immigrant youth. This study is based on ethnographic research and 80 interviews with children "language brokers" who translate for their immigrant parents in racialized and English-speaking spaces of America.

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Whereas most sociological studies on children of immigrants examine how well they assimilate into U.S. society, Hyeyoung employs interactional and intersectional approaches and argue that racialized nativism is at the heart of their family lives, constraining immigrant families' access to public resources and creating a difficult double bind for children of immigrants. Her previous research has been published in Childhood and Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. Her recent research on youth resistance and everyday performance is forthcoming in Social Problems.

Adam BledsoeAdam Bledsoe, CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2016-2018
adbledso@indiana.edu

Adam Bledsoe is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at Indiana University. He received his PhD in 2016 from the Department of Geography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on racialization, social movements, and struggle in the context of the African Diaspora. Adam’s dissertation draws on participatory research, archival work, and critical theory to examine the historical and contemporary struggles of Black communities in Salvador, Brazil, as they seek to defend their territories from a series of land grabs. He is currently revising articles from his dissertation and working on a book manuscript tentatively titled “Defending Our Piece of Ground: The Quilombos of the Bay of Aratu.”

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Dorainne LevyDorainne Levy, CRRES Postdoctoral Scholar, 2016-2018
dojlevy@indiana.edu

Dorainne Levy is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University. She received her PhD in 2016 from the Department of Psychology at Northwestern University. Dorainne's research primarily explores how discrimination shapes affective, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological outcomes that, in turn, have implications for racial/ethnic disparities in many life domains. She is currently revising articles from her dissertation entitled "The Effects of Emotion Regulation Strategies when Contending with Discrimination Experiences."

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Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society
Schuessler Institute for Social Research
1022 E. 3rd St., Room 209,
Bloomington, IN 47405
812-855-8016

Office Hours: Monday and Friday: 7:45 am – 11:45 am
Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday: 12:15 pm - 4:15 pm