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College of Arts and Sciences

Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society

Center for Research on
Race and Ethnicity in Society

CRRES Student Affiliates

The CRRES Student Affiliates are a diverse group of students who have a central interest in the study of race and ethnicity. Research conducted by current CRRES graduate student affiliates ranges from examining racial disparities in educational gaps on a national level to investigating the racialized experiences of immigrant women in new immigrant destinations in the South and Midwest.

Applying to Become a Student Affiliate

Jessica David

Jessica David  jldavid@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Counseling Psychology
Jessica's research interests include racial identity, stress and coping, and student-athlete health and holistic development. She is also a graduate assistant for the Groups Scholars Program, an initiative created to address low attendance rates of marginalized populations and first-generation college students. As a member of the Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Diversity Outreach Team, she works to raise mental health awareness in traditionally underserved populations on IU's campus.

Ryan J. Davis

Ryan J. Davis  ryjdavis@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Higher Education (School of Education)
Ryan's research interests focus on understanding pedagogies that influence learning and success in STEM disciplines, particularly among underrepresented students of color. He coauthored the monograph Racial and Ethnic Minorities Students’ Success in STEM Education (Jossey-Bass) and he has coauthored 10 peer reviewed journal articles about the role of race in the experiences and outcomes of college students.

Kirk A. HarrisKirk A. Harris  kirkharr@umail.iu.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Political Science

Kirk studies democracy and development in Sub-Saharan Africa – a research focus that brings together work on the politics of development, ethnicity, and democratic accountability.  Kirk’s dissertation examines how variation in the political salience of ethnicity in Kenya mediates the provision of local public goods like schools, clinics, and roads by Kenya’s Constituency Development Fund (CDF).

Samuel H. Kye

Samuel H. Kye  skye@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Sociology
Sam’s current research examines middle-class ethnic neighborhoods known as ethnoburbs: ethnic yet suburban neighborhoods of affluence, representing the outcome of unprecedented levels of minority population growth over the past quarter century and the continued movement of minority groups into the American “mainstream.” He is formulating quantitative analysis strategies to add to this growing research field at the nexus of sociology, political science, and American studies.

Samuel H. Kye

Julius Lee    jflee@indiana.edu
M.S. Student, School of Public Health
Julius is a first-generation Masters student majoring in Public Health with an emphasis in Behavioral, Social and Community Health. As a Ronald E. McNair Scholar, he has facilitated research on faith-based organizations and childhood development, and a feasibility study on school-based health care at a local Title-I elementary school. His interests also include the prevalence of Meningitis among same-sex relationships, and the lack of public health initiatives to better serve incarcerated populations. 

Jordan Lynton

Jordan Lynton  jylynton@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Anthropology
Jordan's research interests include transnationalism, hyphenated identities, immigrant networks, and cultural associations, principally concerning the Chinese Diaspora in the Caribbean. She has spent extensive time in Jamaica conducting fieldwork on Chinese communities and cultural organizations in Kingston. Her dissertation project utilizes ethnographic methodology with geographic spatial analysis in order to consider identity formation and citizenship negotiation in Chinese-Jamaican communities.

Elizabeth A. Martinez

Elizabeth A. Martinez  martela@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Sociology
Elizabeth’s research interests broadly include race/ethnicity, education, and immigration. She is specifically interested in the racialization of Asians and Latinos, specifically within education. Her current research examines race-gender differences in teacher perceptions among Latino high school students and the influence of instructor last name on undergraduate students’ course enrollment choices.

Tamara Mitchell 

Tamara Mitchell  mitchetl@umail.iu.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Tamara focuses on the residual effects of transnational politics and economics in society and literature. By considering texts such as Roberto Bolaño’s 2666, her research questions the ways in which international corporations and growing Neoliberal politics affect culture, and how literature can be engaged as a means of analyzing the increasingly transnational society in which we live.

Alaina E. Roberts

Alaina E. Roberts  aer99@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History
Alaina's research explores the lives and identity discourses of the African American former slaves of Chickasaw Indians. Her dissertation delves into the intersection of Civil War and Reconstruction in the Chickasaw Nation and the actions of Chickasaw Freedpeople to gain Chickasaw or U.S. citizenship, establish schools for their children, and stake claims on land within the Chickasaw Nation that they and their families had come to call home. Alaina is also interested in tracing the way dialogues about Chickasaw Freedpeople and Afro-Chickasaws have been maintained through family oral histories.

Alaina E. Roberts

C. Kevin Taber   cktaber@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Political Science
Kevin’s dissertation research explores the transnational political activities and activism of sub-Saharan African migrant associations in the U.S. While conducting his fieldwork primarily among Ghanaian organizations, his research is particularly focused on the ways in which ethnic, linguistic, communal, and other forms of heterogeneity within migrant groups may shape collective transnational political efforts.

Lei Wang

Lei Wang  lw55@indiana.edu
Ph.D. Student, Department of Counseling Psychology
Lei's research interests involve racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S., particularly international students and Asian Americans. She focuses on issues of mental health, cultural orientation, cross-national experiences, and related problems of perfectionism, shame, alcohol use, bystander intervention, and suicidal patterns. Lei has co-led a support group for Chinese international students and currently provides counseling services to Mandarin-speaking students and community members at the Center for Human Growth.

Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society
Schuessler Institute for Social Research
1022 E. 3rd St., Room 209,
Bloomington, IN 47405
812-855-8016

Office Hours: Monday and Friday: 7:45 am – 11:45 am
Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday: 12:15 pm - 4:15 pm